The Weekender

The Weekender

The Weekender

The Weekender by ALAN NAFZGER

Pecan Street Press

Lubbock ● Austin ● Fort Worth

The Weekender is a work of fiction. Names, characters, businesses, places, events, locales, and incidents are either the products of the author’s imagination or used in a fictitious manner. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, or actual events is purely coincidental.

Amazon edition

FREE DOWNLOAD – http://freeebooks.us/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/THE-WEEKENDER.pdf

 

Copyright © 2015 Alan Nafzger

All rights reserved.

ISBN: 9781072226406


THE WEEKENDER

The Weekender TV Series Pilot

The Weekender Written by Alan Nafzger

The Weekender
The Weekender

The Weekender FADE IN

INT. WEDDING – SATURDAY AFTERNOON

It’s a grand wedding. People file out of the church into the reception. JUSTIN (50) and his wife CAROLYN (40) and their daughter, JANE (17) is there. Justin is mater of fact in attendance only. He’s not exited or bored. He only smiles if someone calls his name. Justin has been a teacher and several of his former students greet him he won’t recall anyone’s name, but smiles like he remembers them. He’s somewhat in a daze and overwhelmed by the social occasion. He has a line he always uses on former students he meets.

 

FORMER STUDENTS

Hello, Mr. Bentley

 

JUSTIN

Hey, good to see you. Are you famous yet?

 

FORMER STUDENTS

Uh… no.

 

JUSTIN

Oh, damn. I would have thought by now… Listen don’t give up. I figure pretty soon.

 

FORMER STUDENTS

Hello, Mr. Bentley.

 

And this exchange generally gets him through the encounter. It happens several times as he moves through the reception.

 

Jane is not in her element (a punk rock night club). No friends at the wedding. She simply walks around the reception.

 

JERRYD (17) is an African america/" 772 target="_self">American kid he is watching Justin through the crowd and he manoeuvres behind Jane with a Champaign glass.

 

JERRYD

Your dad’s cool.

 

Jerryd gives her the glass and she slams it back and hands the glass back to him.

 

Jane has a sweet innocent face but inside she is a punk rocker and a rebel. You wouldn’t know her real personality except for the single facial piercing. She’s not amused and is actually sour.

 

JANE

No, he’s not.

 

JERRYD

Sure he is. He’s top dog.

 

JANE

He can’t be your favourite teacher.

 

JERRYD

He is.

 

JANE

I thought you were some sort of math nerd.

 

JERRYD

Math is boring. Politics is where it’s at.

 

JANE

God, I want to barf.

 

A large man, JUDGE BEAN (60), approaches Jane and Jerryd fades away. Jerryd fears authority.

 

JUDGE

Jane.

 

JANE

Judge!

 

Jane lights up. The judge’s daughter is her best friend.

 

JANE

Is Beth here?

 

No, she didn’t come. I don’t think she knew you were coming or she might have come.

 

JANE

Oh, I told her I wasn’t coming.

 

JUDGE

Oh?

 

JANE

And then my parent’s made me.

 

JUDGE

Oh, I see.

 

JANE

Oh, I’m sorry. That was rude to say.

 

JUDGE

Not necessarily.

(half beat)

Well, there is an election coming up and I need to talk to your dad.

(half beat)

Good to see you.

 

JANE

Tell Beth, Hi.

 

The judge goes to talk to Justin.

 

Jane turns around to find Jerryd. He’s not there but after a minute he reappears with another Champaign glass this time on a serving tray.

 

Jane takes the glass and slams it again and hands the glass back. She’s obviously expertly trained in under-age drinking.

 

JANE

Are you working?

 

No but if you’re a black man with a tray they just give you all the alcohol you want.

 

JANE

Quick learner.

(half beat)

We might be able to get along. Can you bring me some more?

 

JERRYD

I’ll be right back.

 

A beautiful Hispanic woman, JUDY (27) approaches Justin.

 

JUDY

Hello, Mr. Bentley. Remember me?

 

JUSTIN

Hey, good to see you. Listen, are you famous yet?

 

JUDY

Uh… I’m an attorney.

 

JUSTIN

Well, then you’re infamous then.

 

JUDY

I’m sure the prosecutors think that.

 

JUSTIN

Oh, a defense lawyer. Giving them fits huh? At least you’re on the right side.

 

JUDY

I like to think so.

 

JUSTIN

You don’t happen to have a card do you?

 

Justin wants to remember her name.

 

JUDY

(jokingly)

Think you’ll need a lawyer soon?

 

JUSTIN

I have four dogs in my back yard.

 

JUDY

The law only allows for three.

 

JUSTIN

And I ride my bike at night without the proper lights.

 

JUDY

Serious crimes.

 

JUSTIN

What am I gonna do?

 

JUDY

Well call me.

 

She hands him a business card.

 

JUSTIN

I will.

 

JUDY

I appreciate what you did.

 

JUSTIN

You sat in the front row.

 

JUDY

You remember.

 

JUSTIN

Of course.

 

JUDY

Bye.

 

Carolyn is a real estate agent with tons of ambition. She sees the wedding as a sales opportunity.  She’s talking real estate to a potential client, AMANDA.

 

Carolyn

It’s marvellous. You need to see it. The architect is almost famous. Location perfect.

(half beat)

Oh, here’s my husband. He’s the government teacher at the high school. Everyone so counts on him. He was just talking to the judge.

(half beat)

Honey, this is Amanda; she’s looking at the Forest Street house.

 

Justin simply smiles and politely nods.  Justin is a bit socially awkward. He only feels comfortable in the classroom and with people who knew him from the classroom. His wife takes him aside…

 

Carolyn

You want to lighten up a bit?

 

JUSTIN

I’m having fun.

 

Carolyn

You need a drink.

 

JUSTIN

Honey, you know I don’t drink. I don’t like it.

 

Carolyn

I know honey but you’re at a party. It’s a wedding!

 

JUSTIN

Still…

 

Carolyn

Well, will you be a dear and bring me some more?

 

Carolyn turns back to Amanda.

 

Carolyn

There’s a pool. well, of course. And the most marvellous breakfast slash garden room. You’ll love it.

 

Justin leaves to fetch some Champaign for his wife.

 

INT. SUBURBAN HOME – SATURDAY NIGHT

 

Carolyn is in bed reading a “power of positive thinking” book.

 

Jane is in her room listening to punk rock. She has the headphones on, but we can still hear the music. It’s muffled but clearly she is blasting it. Self-destructive behaviour – her hearing.

 

Justin is on the couch. He looks ill. He walks up to the master bathroom and looks in the medicine cabinet. Nothing. Not a thing.

 

JUSTIN

Honey, I’m not feeling well. I think I have the flu. I’m going to the drug store.

 

Carolyn nods quickly and returns to the book.

 

Coming down the stairs, Justin looks dizzy and almost tumbles… he stops and collects himself. He is sweating profusely and is pale.

 

INT. JUSTIN’S VEHICLE – SATURDAY NIGHT

 

Justin looks very ill. Driving, he is careful but he looks amazingly worse than before. He pulls up to the all night drug store. He drags himself into the store.

 

INT. POLICE VEHICLE – SATURDAY NIGHT

 

A young ROOKIE POLICEMAN is hidden from passing traffic. He has a call on the radio.

 

RADIO

How many DWI’s rookie?

 

POLICEMAN

This month?

 

RADIO

Your time is almost up. Month ends in less than an hour.

 

POLICEMAN

I have 18 this month.

 

RADIO

It’s a tie. Too bad I really wanted to see someone break Caine’s record. He’s an ass.

 

POLICEMAN

Well, you never know.

 

RADIO

Tied for most DWI arrests in a month for a rookie isn’t bad.

 

POLICEMAN

Another hour you say?

 

RADIO

48 mins ‘till midnight.

 

INT. JUSTIN’S VEHICLE – SATURDAY NIGHT

 

Justin has $28 worth of drugs. Flu medicine. Cold medicine. Cough medicine. It’s all laid out in the passenger’s seat.

 

He tries to read the instructions but he is so ill he can’t concentrate long enough. He takes one of each pill and chases them down with cough medicine. The cough medicine tastes good so he finishes the entire bottle.

 

He starts the car and begins his path home.

 

He is so ill he can hardly hold his head up. He understands that he has the flu and it might be dangerous to drive… he sits up straight and is focused on the driving.

 

A police car pulls behind him. He looks back.

 

A toddler gets away from his mother and darts about a foot or two into the street. Justin swerves and the mother pulls the kid back up on the sidewalk.

 

The policeman sees Justin’s car swerve, but he misses the mother and the kid. He turns on his lights and pulls Justin over.

 

INT/EXT. SIDe OF THE ROAD – JUSTIN’S VEHICLE

 

The rookie policeman (21) approaches the vehicle.

 

POLICEMAN

Sir the reason I stopped you is because I don’t think you have total control of your vehicle. You swerved for no apparent reason.

 

JUSTIN

There was a toddler half way out in the road.

 

The policeman looks back a block or two. The mother and the toddler have disappears into a house or down a side street.

 

POLICEMAN

Sir, I don’t see anyone. Have you been drinking.

 

JUSTIN

I don’t drink. I’m just ill. I think I have the flu. You don’t want the flu do you?

 

POLICEMAN

Sir, please step out of the car.

(beat)

Stand over there please, while I search your vehicle.

 

The policeman searches the vehicle.

 

POLICEMAN

Can you say the alphabet backward?

 

JUSTIN

Probably not. Never could. You just want to claim that’s probable cause… funny when almost NO ONE can do that.

 

POLICEMAN

Ok, since you can’t, I’m going to have you blow into this field breathalyser.

 

JUSTIN

What does that mean?

 

POLICEMAN

Well, if it’s .8 then you’re going to jail.

 

JUSTIN

If it’s less?

 

POLICEMAN

Then you’re free to go.

 

JUSTIN

Great. Give it here.

 

Justin blows into the machine.

 

It calculates… point three. It clearly reads “.3”

 

The policeman is corrupt; two in ten are. J

 

POLICEMAN

Point eight. I’m sorry sir. Place your hands on the vehicle. I’m going to pat you down.

 

JUSTIN

That’s wrong.

 

POLICEMAN

You don’t have anything on you that’s going to stick me.

 

JUSTIN

What does that mean?

 

POLICEMAN

Are you an addict, sir?

 

JUSTIN

Of course not.

 

The policeman pats him down.

 

POLICEMAN

Well, you look to me like your coming down from something.

 

JUSTIN

I have the flu.

 

POLICEMAN

Right. Tell it to the judge. I’m going to handcuff you and put you in the back of my vehicle.

 

Justin is handcuffed and put into back of the police car.

 

INT/EXT. CAROLYN’S VEHICLE – SUNDAY MORNING

 

Carolyn is driving Justin from the police station to the impound yard.

 

CAROLYN

But honey, You don’t even drink.

 

JUSTIN

I know, that cop was seriously confused.

 

CAROLYN

Dumb is what he is.

 

JUSTIN

Corrupt. Maybe he’s a kid trying to impress the older cops with a lot of arrests.

 

CAROLYN

Did you see the meter?

 

JUSTIN

No.

 

CAROLYN

Well, why not?  I read every single word in a contract.

 

JUSTIN

He didn’t show me and second I’m sick.

 

CAROLYN

You really have the flu?

 

JUSTIN

I told you that when I left.

 

CAROLYN

Oh, honey. I’m sorry. If I knew you were sick and that this would happen I would have gone to the store for you.

 

JUSTIN

I know, honey.

 

CAROLYN

You were on the news.

 

JUSTIN

You’re kidding.

 

CAROLYN

So what’s going to happen.

 

JUSTIN

I know a lawyer.

 

INT. PRIVATE TOW TRUCK & IMPOUND LOT – SUNDAY

 

The impound yard is run by a greasy IMPOUND GUY who harasses everyone trying to make more money from daily fees and some people just abandon their old cars rather than pay the fees and deal with an unpleasant man. This guy makes more money than anyone in the county gouging people for the return of their cars. He has a contract with the city that allows him to basically steal.

 

JUSTIN

I need to get my car.

(pointing)

That’s car over there.

 

IMPOUND GUY

Oh, the DWI?

(half beat)

Two pieces ID not including your drivers license.

 

JUSTIN

My license isn’t suspended…

 

IMPOUND GUY

But it’s going to be.

 

JUSTIN

That’s not right.

 

IMPOUND GUY

If you want your car back, then I’m right. Understand?

 

Justin hands him his school ID and a library card.

 

IMPOUND GUY

I need government issued ID.

 

JUSTIN

It’s a public school, I’m a teacher.

 

IMPOUND GUY

I wonder how much longer that’s going to last.

 

JUSTIN

I wasn’t drunk.

 

IMPOUND GUY

I need a valid second ID.

 

JUSTIN

This is my card, issued by the pubic… the city library. The official one.

 

IMPOUND GUY

Okay… I just need to make a call.

 

The impound lot owner goes to the back and makes a phone call.

 

IMPOUND GUY

He says you can have your car back, unless you’re still drunk.

 

JUSTIN

I have the flu.

 

IMPOUND GUY

Okay. It’s against my better judgement, but you can have your car back. Four-eighty-three and seventy three cents.

(half beat)

Cash.

 

JUSTIN

What?

(half beat)

You’re kidding me, right.

 

IMPOUND GUY

It’s double on Sundays.

 

JUSTIN

Why?

 

IMPOUND GUY

I’m missing church for this. Damn drunks, you don’t even know the day of the week.

 

 


What is a weekender?

Thanks for the A2A…Instead of a traditional imprisonment, weekends in jail is given to people convicted of nonviolent crimes, such as chronic speeding, DUIs, failure to pay child support and petty thefts, and. Purpose is to allow people to maintain their career and family while serving their sentence.Jail weekends can only happen if the judge imposes a sentence of 90 days or less.

And you have to show the judge that you have a full time job and other significant responsibilities (child care) which would make it very hard to serve a regular jail sentence

So, for example, a college student could serve time and still attend classes, or a single mom whit a full time job could take of her kids and career.They had to report to be checked in on Friday evening and were released each Sunday afternoon and were housed all together in a cell apart from us